Bitcoin Scams

Cryptsy Implodes with Bizarre Blog Statement

High profile online crypto exchange Cryptsy (the subject of much speculation over the last few weeks), finally published a blog ‘addressing’ the issues it has been having. The foremost requirement in the minds of customers was an explanation detailing the reasons withdrawals have not been possible recently.

In a bizarre blog post Cryptsy admitted that the previously published ‘phishing’ attack was not the reason for the current issues and instead claimed that a Hack in 2014 by the Devs behind Lucky7coin had caused the platform to lose thousands of bitcoins. The blog by Paul Vernon also went on (incredibly) to say that it saw no need to inform customers about the hack as it thought it could ‘recover the funds’ through profitable trading conditions!

Vernon is offering a 1000 btc reward for information directly leading to a recovery of the missing funds.

The blog at http://blog.cryptsy.com states that the site is looking for a resolution:

“Here are our options:

1. We shut down the website and file bankruptcy, letting users file claims via the bankruptcy process and letting the court make the disbursements.

– or –

2. Somebody else comes in to purchase and run Cryptsy while also making good on requested withdrawals.

– or –

3. If somehow we are able to re-aquire the stolen funds, then we allow all withdrawal requests to process.

I’m obviously open to any other ideas people may have on this.

If you have information, you can email reward@cryptsy.com”

Our view:

Another major setback for crypto and a spectacular failure by Cryptsy.

 

Ponzis, Scams, Theft and The Price Of Bitcoin

Christmas 2014 will go down in history as a time when hackers, thieves and ponzis changed everything. As I write this post BTC has sunk to $186 (and was considerably lower earlier in the day), major cloud mining operations have powered down their farms (cex.io and hashnest) and unless the price recovers the whole BTC landscape will irreversibly change.

What has caused the current issues?

Around Christmas Eve several cloud mining operations including PB Mining, Hashie, Hashprofit and LTC Gear suffered hacks or operational issues with a net effect of halting payments to customers. The circumstances and validity of each issue no doubt vary but the consensus seems to be that PB mining could well have been a ponzi although the operators claim the closure was a result of blackmail and personal threats. Hashie claimed a hack although the way they dealt with the aftermath screamed incompetance or ponzi. Hashprofit claimed a db breach although in hindsight this looks like a solid ponzi and finally LTC Gear more believably claimed a hack but the jury is still out as the website has still to recover and they are several weeks behind with payments.

To compound matters, the large exchange Bitstamp had a major breach/hack involving the theft of $5 million worth of Bitcoin. Clearly evoking memories of the Mt. Gox situation, the markets reacted badly to an already depressed value.

So what next?

Some are predicting a crash of epic proportions and the death of bitcoin (many of these doommongers are from traditional financial institutions who are threatened in the extreme by cryptocurrency). Their insecurity is manifesting itself into unprecedented attacks during the ongoing slump. Witness this Guardian article (very naive in it’s assumption that Bitcoin has no use)

Our View

Cryptocurrency is in an embryonic stage similar to the birth of the internet. Such great ideas will always prosper even though the naysayers will do their utmost to put a ‘spanner in the works’. Our philosophy is to sit tight, buy bitcoin and ride out the slump.

 

Latest Bitcoin Scam Alerts

Nothing annoys us more than Bitcoin scams. They use popular anonymous ad networks like btcclicks to hoodwink users into thinking they can double, treble or 10x their money overnight.

If it looks too good to be true it probably is! Also, it’s about time the Ad networks developed some accountability. It would be easy for them to identify the fraudulent sites and simply not run the ads but instead they take the money from anyone and blindly run anything.

You can get an up to date list of the scam sites at Badbitcoin.org

Sites to avoid currently advertising heavily are bitx10.com – more info at badbitcoin.org and paymemoney.biz more here

If you surf ads for Bitcoin at btcclicks.com we’ve also noticed a flaw in their system.
We recently heard of a user that went to withdraw their earnings. They changed the BTC address for withdrawal and were instantly banned for ‘multiple accounts’ with no comebacks and the money earned confiscated by BTCClicks. This smacks of being unethical, so beware if you have an account there.

Beware Bitcoin Scams!

How to avoid bitcoin scams

The Bitcoin community is a fairly solid one but like anything gathering traction, rogues will infiltrate at will. The anonymity of Bitcoin with the benefit of decentralization can also be it’s weakness.

Scam sites can remain undetected and once your cryptocurrency leaves your wallet there isn’t a great deal you can do to get it back. One site looking to change all that is Badbitcoin.org which lists dubious websites.

Kosher sites can ask to be delisted from the site if a mistake has been made, but the site is worth a scan before you dive in to any double your money schemes. One such site currently advertising heavily is doubleurbtc.com. It promises quick returns on your investment with daily payouts. The only problem is that once you’ve received the first few payments, your account suddenly disappears and you’ve been scammed!

Bitcoin Magazine

Bitcoin Magazine (Photo credit: zcopley)